P = NG

After my previous adventures in rendering .png files to a software framebuffer, I realised that I needed to convert between lodepng’s RGBA 4-bits-per-pixel format to Libretro’s RGB565 format. My studies since my last post brought me to pixconv.c which has a function, conv_rgba4444_argb8888, that does just that type of conversion. I need to give the function the following in this order:

  1. the output variable
  2. the input variable
  3. the dimensions of the image file
  4. the output pitch
  5. the input pitch

In theory, all I had to do was add lodepng and pixconv.c to my project, run a test.png file through those two, and put the resulting data in the framebuffer.

The result was a mess. Learning that <iostream>, a stape at my studies of C++, was worthless when working in C, was actually the easy part. Even if I did not exactly know what type of data type were the variables that held the RGBA4444 and RGB565 arrays (I settled on unsigned char when void did not work), the makefile refused to recognize lodepng_decode32_file and logepng_error_text, even after I put those two types in various places (though not at the same time) inside the actual libretro_test.c file. I learned that this issue comes from the linker, which is related to the makefile.

At this point, I decided to give up at least temporarily. I mean, while there is the possibility that this is the last problem and that I actually have everything else right, I decided that this matter requires advanced knowledge that is specialized on C++. I mean, I have a Master’s Degree in Software Engineering, but my actual usage of the fundamentals of C++ and related languages were all in Integrated Development Environments. I barely know anything more than how to run make (not “CMake”, but “make”)!

This lack of specialized knowledge is also the reason why I am no longer pursing either adapting a current C++ engine to Libretro or, per Radius’ suggestion, using OpenGL. I still would have to deal with compiling the C++ code in those situations.

In light of this, I was looking more seriously at Rust, which has bindings to Libretro. While Rust is not object-oriented in the conventional sense, Rust has features that have just about the same functionality anyway. The problem is checking how the current game engines that use Rust render graphics. After all, I want to use software rendering because I want my games to be played at the full range of consoles that run Retroarch, not just the ones that can handle both versions of OpenGL.

I am also seriously considering going back to Lua per my original plans. Not only does LÖVE have no need of a distinct compilation process but also displays graphics through an API that works great and easy. In fact, the ease of use LÖVE provides is the reason why I picked using LÖVE instead of straight C++ in the first place! The main reason why I am not so sure is because that the reason why I wanted to leave Lua in the first place was because Lua did not have any proper support of object-oriented programming. I would much rather use the real deal, especially since Re-Hoard needs object-oriented programming! Even if there is an alternative, this lack of functionality may hamper heavily my plans of future games!

I tried to see how Lutro, Libretro’s interpreter of LÖVE, displays games written in LÖVE. I mean, LÖVE apparently uses SDL, but that does not seem to be a problem to Lutro. However, I got overwhelmed once again.

Eevee is right; if I were to write from scratch, I would be essentially inventing the universe if I needed to get off the ground. Then there is compilation afterwards.

Broken Physics; Broken Graphics

I am starting to change my mind.

I looked into Chipmunk after Box2D warned me about Box2D requiring a lot of C++ experience. However, Chipmunk itself seems too complex. Worse, I could not find an API-indifferent way of putting graphics on the physics objects!

I looked into other game engines, but they, true to my predictions, use SDL or OpenGL and do not seem to have ways of rendering directly to the framebuffer. Speaking of the framebuffer, I am still awaiting on information on what exactly is a framebuffer in the first place. On Radius’ defense, Radius is probably taking time out of a busy day in making an appropriate reply.

I just feel frustrated because I feel lost. Radius gave me a much-needed nudge, but I need more.

I am not going back to Lua because I need the capabilities that C++ or Rust give. Even so, the Rust libraries and engines probably have the same dependencies on SDL or OpenGL that the other game engines have.

I should be spending this time working on my PICO-8 games.

I shall look at rpng, Libretro’s own decoder of .png graphics. That, being of Libretro itself, should have a way of rendering directly to the framebuffer.