Reckless Foresight

When I formed my goal of releasing Re-Hoard and Reckless Abandon on September 10, I was thinking only on coding, graphics, and music.

I realized recently that there are more steps after that.

I am not only talking about testing or even translation. I want to give these games their own mini websites, advertising (with stellar art), and, in all, a proper release. That requires not only more programming, but also skills in how to use CSS, how to draw skillfully, and so on. I would also have to make the websites fascinating yet skillfully coded and designed. I would also have to add new features, including a guestbook and privacy policy.

In all, I need to give the games the respect they deserve.

I knew that making September 10 a mere goal instead of a promise was wise.

Advertisements

Release goals of Re-Hoard and Reckless Abandon

Please excuse the news blackout. Since July, I needed to rest, first. Afterwards, I got a new computer that replaced my old one which had a malfunctioning keyboard. After that, I spent my time setting up my computer to my liking and getting used to a new keyboard layout based on the 2nd ANSI Keyboard variation of the DH Colemak mod.* I am still yet from fully used to this layout, but I am reasonably competent here. Besides, I should not be putting off development of my games so long.

How does September 10 sound? I am not making any promises, but I should be getting back to work.

Lua to the End?

From the beginning of my game career, I intended to make games that use Libretro, a C/C++ library that can be used in writing emulators and standalone games. The reason why I learned Lua in the first place was because, compared to using straight C or C++, writing games in Lua and relying on the Lutro core seemed to be the more comfortable option. Indeed, because Lua programs do not need to be compiled, I ended up saving myself plenty of precious time in my last two college projects back when I took my Master’s Degree. Developing my final project using LÖVE instead of trying to understand the Libretro library, especially given the one-trimester deadline, spared me from a lot of grief. That knowledge of Lua also helped me develop games for the PICO-8, an all-in-one platform that not only helped me get used to normal game development but also has several channels of delivery, my favourite one being uploading the game itself in image format. You can even play these games in your browser with little fuss!

However, I am starting to feel the limitations Lua has. While Reckless Abandon has simple code, Re-Hoard has a game plan that needs object-oriented programming when generating random anti-hoarders, each with their own patrolling and hunting styles, per stage. Lua does not have any object-oriented functionality; other people fake that functionality using metatables. Even with that fake functionality, I fear that I would be better off relying on the real thing. Besides, if Lua lacked true object-oriented functionality, then what else would Lua lack? Other consideration include less layers of abstraction that might interfere with my wanting to interact with Libretro itself, the bigger maturity of C++ tools and libraries, and practice in a language that is still in high demand in the workplace. In fact, the more advanced aspects of Lua actually use a C library!

On the other hand, the gains from the lack of a compilation time proved to be an assets when I debugged my college projects. Also, LÖVE games store their assets as-is instead of they being baked directly in the program; I can edit a sprite or switch around a song and see the effects when running the game anew.

Despite these benefits, I am seriously considering working on my new games with C++ from now on. In fact, though Reckless Abandon would stay a PICO-8 game, I might move Re-Hoard to C++.

I just need to figure out how to display and move .png sprites and implement collision detection while I use Libretro.

Reckful Spriting

I managed to do almost all of the graphics of Reckless Abandon. I was actually out of ideas by the time I stopped, but I thankfully got almost everything done there. Other than that, I still have to do the bonus exhibit and a secret or so.

I stopped temporarily because I both wanted to rest and celebrate. I wanted the ideas to come, but that needed me stepping away from the game. Even coding would not give the rest my mind needed in gathering ideas.

I think I got almost all the ideas I needed since then now.

I feel accomplished that I did so much. I hope that I can release both Reckless Abandon and Re-Hoard by the end of this month.

A Human-Sized Wall

Recently, I started working on Reckless Abandon again. Weirdly, my problem was that I had trouble figuring out how to draw humans in sprite form. I think the reason behind my hesitation was because I am going to do a big number of human-based designs in both Reckless Abandon and Re-Hoard, yet in theory, there are several ways of drawing humans. There is a lot hanging on this base concept.

I decided to take my time in loosening up my human designs.

humans

The one I like the most is the purple design due to its reasonable compactness while still being recognizable and animatable.

Abandoning a Reckless Pace

Neither Re-Hoard nor Reckless Abandon are going to be released by Comi-Con this year.

Ever since my last post, I took my time both recovering and considering my needs. I realized that I would not be able to deliver a good product (or maybe any product) by that deadline. My health and other kinds of energy trump any business opportunities.

That does not mean that I would stop. I just needed to recover from the deadly pace I took. In fact, a couple of days ago, I reoriented myself on listing what both games still needed.

However, I fear that, given that this is my second delay, I am setting up an image of lazy unreliability.

Reckless with my Energy

Yesterday, I was stuck on how to represent the countries when designing the exhibits. Thankfully, I got the ideas going at night. I think I just needed to let my brain work out this stuff by itself and respect the time my brain needs on working on stuff in general.

The problem is that I had little energy for working on the game today. I do not have the will of working on stuff immediately after I wake up; I need to “buffer”. I only start getting that will at noon, but, even after 1:00 PM, I still had no desire to work on this. I played some electronic games, thus recovering my emotional energy. I then slept, yet, 3 hours later, I still felt tired. I decided to just work anyways. I added enough notes and started drawing the props. However, I just… want to sleep more. Besides, I am typing this sentence at 10:33 PM.

I want to get this game out before Comi-Con, but my health may require me to postpone those plans.

Recklessly Stuck

I am surprised and embarrassed on being stuck in this game. The coding itself did not give me problems this time, but the content did. Worse, I thought that I had developed the idea thoroughly, but I have problems finding out how I should do the exhibits. I got a general idea, but I got trouble turning that idea into specific exhibits.

…I do not like stopping here, especially since I want to have both games done by Comi-Con, but I feel that I need to do more research beforehand. Besides, this is just a temporary detour.

…at least I hope that this is just a temporary detour…

Not Recklessly Abandoned

I owe you some explanation.

I actually worked on Reckless Abandon today and yesterday.

After I took my time taking a better look at how the API and Collide demonstration cartridges worked, I started yesterday. That day, I experimented with some code and did a couple of dummy tiles while adding to my notes. Today, I made the iguana character, a key, and a few tiles, the carpet tile replacing a dummy tile (that was a light green that had a dark-green outline). I also got down the rhythm and length of the main song.

I am surprised at how much I have progressed already… especially in the coding part. Then again, the Pico-8 was meant for this quick stuff.

72 hours…

I earlier mentioned that, because both Re-Hoard and Reckless Abandon are half-developed, I can follow eevee’s lead on developing these Pico-8 games in 72 hours.

The issue is that eevee developed her game in 72 dedicated hours (save necessities, of course).

…I can dedicate myself that much, though, to some extent, but this is a flash of perspective that I missed when I wrote my last post.

I should get to playing around with the demos today.