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Banjo Laylee

Recently, Yooka-Laylee got a rolling release.

While the game had a very successful Kixkstarter campaign, a big following, and successful delivery, Yooka-Laylee got some controversy over not only being too far a clone of the original Banjo Kazooie games but also copying the flaws of 3D collection/platformer games.

I am worried that Wuu Shyng would end up the same way.

While I plan on writting a more proper post on this idea, suffice to say that, from Telefang to Mino Monsters, clones of Pokémon did not really connect with audiences and, in fact, had even gotten controversy over this matter. I want Wuu Shyng to be a spiritual successor and a “love letter” of some sorts to Pokémon, but I do not want to blatanty clone the game, especially not its flaws. In fact, part of the reason why I am making Wuu Shying is because I want to fix flaws that the original Pokémon had! If this game does not go right…

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Which flags?

At the time I am writing this post, In the splash page of both my websites, the visitor would encounter 3 flags, each which represent a language: English, Spanish, and Esperanto.

Esperanto was obvious because the language got its own flag.

English was intuitive; because the grand majority of my dealings with the English-language world is in the United States, the leading English-speaking country in technology. Also, I live in Puerto Rico, a US territory, making the choice of the US flag more logical.

Spanish was the hardest because my main markets are both Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic. Though the Dominican Republic’s exclusivity to the Spanish language might make its flag the better choice, I decided on Puerto Rico because I was born there and currently live there. I still wish I can find a way to appeal to the market in the Dominican Republic in a more specific matter, though.

The big issue, however, is Chinese, a language that I am currently practising. There are “simplified” and “traditional” versions of the written language.

The following countries used the simplified version: The People’s Republic of China, Singapore, Malaysia.

The following countries use the traditional version: The Republic of China (Taiwan), Hong Kong, Macau.

You can probably think that the best thing would be to have China’s flag represent the simplified writing and Taiwan represent the traditional writing because they are the countries that have the biggest worldwide influence. The problem is that they tend to not be friendly with each other. They have opposing political and economical ideas, both countries actively opposing each other. Someone from China might see the Taiwanese flag and get too upset, or again, the other way around would occur.

Am I just baselessly assuming things, though?

I’ll have plenty of time that I could put on deciding which flags to use. I just want to get this thought out into the public and hopefully get good answers.

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This American-Japanese font

Did anyone else notice these types of fonts that come up in Japanese games now and again? You know… that Latin script font that seems to be “cartoony” yet “animeish” at the same time?

Harmoknight, especially, seems to really like using this font in its sound effects:

How can I write in that font? I really like that font.

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Re-Hoard: main and panic themes

Even though I liked Robert Duguay’s Nine Songs in Pico-8, the fact that they were not freely-licensed always bothered me. I decided to make my own.

Actually, other than transcribing a few songs ‒ some partially, some fully ‒ I never made a full song before. I never even went through formal music training other than eevee’s post on music. Here, I just went by a sort of mindful intuition: while some of this was me going by what “sounds great”, I also asked myself questions that I felt that should be asked, the main one being, “Does this contribute to the overall feeling I want to convey?” I ended up with a song that “tells a story,” so to speak.

I made these in the music tool of WarioWare: DIY, used a male-male 3.5 mm cable from the headphone slot in my New 3DS XL to the microphone slot in a computer I use, then recorded, modified and exported them in Audacity. (I wish the in-game player did not make a sound when you start playing the song…) The MIDI files came from the WarioWare DIY Editor.

 

Discreetly…

Time to Panic!!!

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These works are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

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My favorite music tool

Almost every music tool was either too complicated (LMMS) or too restricted (Advanced Mario Sequencer). The one tool that managed to hit the best medium was, surprisingly, the music editor tool in WarioWare: DIY.

The audio range is varied yet not overbearing; 32 instruments (not counting the drum sets) provide the sound behind 2 scales that provide the notes of 4 tracks and a rhythm/drum track. The actual interface is extremely intuitive; because every note and 4 phrases make a grid located behind the Touch Screen, I can place notes intuitively, the name of the note appearing when I place the note. Of course, there is also a piano besides the grid, which lets me determine a note by ear, though, sadly, does not display the note when I touch the respective key. I can also copy and move the notes within the grid and between the two pages that, together, make an 8-phrase “block”. I can also test how an instrument sounds both by itself and in the context of one or every track. There is also volume control, undo, and import from other “blocks”. The “block” interface itself permits easy movement and copying of blocks. I can even move the flag that marks the end of a song, letting me move “experimental” “blocks” past the flag. Other notable features include “block”-undo and tempo-alteration.

More advanced music-makers may be aghast at my preferrence of such a “primitive” tool but this tool is the best fit to my needs.

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I should start over.

Not long after I posted my last post, I fully realized that, when I was making my first game, I actually did very little preparatory work before just diving into the editor. Despite how fun that would sound, I was clueless all this time at how stuff worked in the Pico-8! Most relevantly, how could I learn how the opponents were to move if I had trouble with the physics!

That was stupid of me.

I decided to take my time exploring the Pico-8 more thoroughly before I go back to the game. I would still work on the assets, but the actual coding would have to wait until I get used to things more.

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No help yet…

I posted in the Lexaloffle Forums, but I did not get a response even after about a week. I wonder what I did wrong in writing my post… I modified my post by making my request more specific, but I just do not know what else to write. I am so blocked; I don’t even know how to properly articulate what I need.

Maybe I can use this opportunity to “refresh” the code. I should branch the code, first, in case someone from the forums notices my edited post. Thankfully for me, posts that are edited also get “bumped” to the top of the BBS list, making unnecessary the need of “bump” posts and all that.

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Delays and Re-Hoard

One of the most iconic quotes from Shigeru Miyamoto: “A delayed game is eventually good, but a rushed game is forever bad.” However, in the Internet, a couple of interesting rebuttals to this quote is Duke Nukem: Forever and The Mighty No. 9, that is, games that had a large development time but ended up underperforming terribly. The problem with that rebuttal is that both of them had undergone gross mismanagement during their long development times. Duke Nukem: Forever kept changing companies. The Mighty No. 9 was Keiji Inafune’s first time managing a game by himself, which involved him making horrible mistakes with his backer’s money among other things.

My time with Re-Hoard gave me an idea of the trouble Mr. Inafune had to stand. The only reason why I am not undergoing the same controversy is because, while Mr. Inafune as running on the money of a huge number of fans who wanted him to revive the same iconic MegaMan franchise that made Mr. Inafune historic in the first place, I am an unknown person who is making something entirely new on my own resources. Also, while The Mighty No. 9 had its development known far and wide, I made public only the source code of my game Re-Hoard because I do not want to cause such a fuss over any problems from my failing to deliver.

Of course, because this is my first game that I am fully developing and releasing, I have gone against a lot of mistakes on the overall development procedure, the most important being my own responsibility on development. More specifically, while I wanted to develop daily, I spent weeks without touching the game. Eventually, I did get around to work.

However…

ReHoardLogic

This is the farthest I could go in developing how the opponents were supposed to act in my game. I stopped in March 3rd.

…I soon remembered why I stopped in the first place. I was not just procrastinating; I was frustrated at not being able to plan how my game is supposed to run! This was the farthest I could do when planning the behavior of the opponents in the game. After that, I would still have to deal with the behavior of the player dragon, the switching between stages, the title screen, and the music, let alone the debugging! At least I managed to find good visual designs of the opponents and the treasure.

I feel stupid and useless over this inability. I spent 5 years in my Bachelor’s Degree and 3 years in my Master’s Degree; shouldn’t I be able to do this stuff by now?

 

I should not be so hard on myself here; this is actually the first time I coded around the Pico-8 API. A lot of things are still new to me. Writing this, I wonder if I went too fast before starting to code my game, even if my game is relatively simple.

I think this would be the best time that I would request help in the forums. I did not want to do so because that might leave a bad impression on others, that is, one where I would promise without delivering a game, but, because I want to actually deliver my game, I willingly put away what is, in the end, just an assumption.

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That was work…

I realized that the reason why the titles of my posts did not appear was because my blog had the default post category set to “Aside” instead of “Standard”. I not only fixed the post category but also fixed gramatical errors.

I also spent time looking for the best blog theme here. I wanted something “fun”, but not neglecting usability or maturity. I got close here.

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FireRed, LeafGreen, Mewtwo

2 weeks ago, Pokémon FireRed and Pokémon LeafGreen were first release.

Today, in these games, Mew gave birth to Mewtwo.

 

I hold Pokémon in high regard. I mean, while I already had a GameBoy Pocket that had Super Mario Bros. 2: 6 Golden Coins (which I played a lot), The Lion King (which I played to an extent), and another game that I forgot (and barely played), Pokémon Silver was not only the reason I got a GameBoy Color but was also my first dive into a dedication of handheld gaming.

The same goes to console gaming: I already had a PSone that had Spyro 3: Year of the Dragon (which I played a lot), Scooby-Doo and the Cyber Chase (which I played to an extent), and Gran Turismo 2 (which I barely played), Pokémon Colosseum (and, more importantly, its Bonus Disc) was not only the reason I got a GameCube but was also my first dive into a dedication of console gaming.

The regard goes farther. This dedication led me to a more eager look into the workings and history of electronic games, the “scene”, hacks, actual game-making, and so on. Pokémon also led me to not only Internet forums but also website-making. Even my current interest in art and languages were, in part, from Pokémon! Even Wuu Shyng, my final project of my master’s degree and a game that I am developing, is based off Pokémon!

Mewtwo himself is significant here; I learned and got into Pokémon when the movie Mewtwo Strikes Back was on videocasette! On Pokémon FireRed and Pokémon LeafGreen, I find these games one of my favourites in the entire series. If I were to be more specific, the refinements from the later generations, ranging from the better controls to the new moves, made the original experience far more comfortable, the comfort even exceeding that of Pokémon Emerald! That way, the brilliance of the original games now shone more clearly. I also like the new things they added, ranging from the Wireless Club to the Sevii Island, though the latter, admittedly, needed some expansion.